Publisher's Commentary

Knowing the difference makes a healthy society


Police officers and soldiers have different duties; a fact both must understand when the other takes over. This principle of police and military being willing to relinquish control – and take it back – is what makes a stable and safe society and country. The events in Ferguson, Missouri dramatically emphasize this point.

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Blue Line Magazine October 2014 Subscribe

NOT A SNITCH LINE


Crime Stoppers is extremely effective at fighting crime, but most people, including many police officers, have no idea how the program operates. There is a general consensus that Crime Stoppers is a snitch line operated by police for gutter dwellers to squeal on other street lizards, but that is completely false.

The newly-published 304-page book – What is Crime Stoppers – dispels the misconceptions, confusion and misunderstanding that people have of the crime-solving concept that came into existence 38 years ago.

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CASE LAW - Preservation concern may justify night search


The disposable nature of items sought in a search warrant can provide the grounds necessary to authorize the night time search of a residence.

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Blue Line News Week October 17, 2014 Subscribe

New missing persons policy announced


Oct 10 2014

In the wake of its unprecedented report on murdered and missing aboriginal women, the RCMP has rolled out a revamped national missing persons policy, including a pair of investigative tools that provide a lens into how police approach disappearances.

The policy, which was circulated to commanding officers in September, introduces two standardized documents: a 13-question risk-assessment form and a 10-page missing-person intake report to help ensure certain information is obtained at the outset of an investigation.

The documents are part of the federal force’s broader effort to address the problem of Canada’s approximately 1,181 murdered and missing aboriginal women.

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